U.S. Department of Energy

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Informatics and Data Science

Informatics.

Invent algorithms, software, and visual analytics to process, analyze, and integrate multi-omics data for biological discovery

Today’s biologists confront an increasing flood of data. Much of it is the result of the multi-omics tools of 21st century biology, the high-throughput technologies that analyze complex proteins, lipids, metabolites, and other small molecules in more detail and at greater speeds than ever.

The key to understanding biological structure and function in living systems is harnessing all this genomics data. These data represent the convergence of biological, physical, and information sciences at the heart of 21st century biology and require new technologies—software, visual analytics, algorithms, and more—to capture, store, access, and analyze.

Our bioinformatics experts use informatics, an offshoot of information engineering, to process biological data with computation, statistics, mathematics, and other tools. Further, they construct interfaces and systems that organize complex data streams.

In addition, our bioinformatics experts employ data science, an emerging interdisciplinary field that uses various methods (e.g., computer science, machine learning, cluster analysis, and visualization) to mine knowledge, trends, and insights from data.

Informatics and data science help the research community organize data, recognize data patterns and correlations, detect anomalies, and develop predictive models.

Team

Dr. Monroe's research involves development of algorithms and software for custom and automated analysis of proteomics and bioinformatics data, including managing, summarizing, and mining the large volumes of data generated by mass spectrometry-based...
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